2018 Seed Grants

Recipients:

  • Eamonn Bell (Graduate Student; Department of Music)
  • Katy Gero (Graduate Student; Department of Computer Science)

Description:

  • By gathering advanced undergraduate and graduate students at Columbia University in a reading group, this project will help increase critical algorithmic literacy.
  • Together, the group will explore how AI – and the algorithms it makes use of – affects and interacts with other disciplines. There is a skills gap in both the computer scientists developing algorithms and those in the arts utilizing them.
  • The reading group’s activities will culminate with a public symposium at Columbia University in December 2018.
  • Read the full article for more information about the reading group or visit its website

Recipient:

  • Alma Igra (Graduate Student; Department of History)

Description:

  • This workshop will bring together graduate students from Columbia University and neighboring institutions with senior staff from the Max Planck Institute for History of Science in Berlin.
  • Participants will discuss animals’ material and bodily presence, contributing to the ways we understand knowledge production, materiality, and the environment.
  • The workshop will close with collaborative writing sessions.

Recipients:

  • Sarika Khanwilkar (Graduate Student; Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology)
  • Pooja Choksi (Graduate Student; Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology)

Description:

  • This event series will host panel discussions, workshops, and presentations to engage graduate students across disciplines.
  • Themes will include: science communication in academic and public contexts; storytelling with scientific tools; bridging the gap between research and practice; and best field practices.

Recipient:

  • Ben Mylius (Graduate Student; Department of Political Science)

Description:

  • The recipient of a 2017-2018 Seed Grant, the Ecosalon will deepen and extend its community in the 2018-2019 year.
  • Interdisciplinary collaboration around ecological issues is vital, but this partnership can be complicated as thinkers working on ecological questions often use the same concepts and language in vastly different ways.
  • By gathering students from across the university to “learn each other’s languages,” the salon provides a safe and friendly venue to ask creative and unexpected questions across the disciplinary divide.
  • Read the full article for more information about Ecosalon. 

Recipient:

  • Joan Robinson (Former Postdoctoral Research Scholar in the Faculty of Law)

Description:

  • This interdisciplinary study will help document the use of pregnancy testing technology as a surveillance tool or a condition of sentencing in the American criminal justice system.
  • Though linking sociology with science and technology studies, this research can contribute to the larger conversation regarding criminal justice reform.

Recipients:

  • Natasha Yamane (Graduate Student; Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology; Teachers College)
  • Sylvie Goldman (Assistant Professor of Neuropsychology; Department of Neurology; Columbia University Medical Center)
  • Rebecca Jordan-Young (Associate Professor; Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Barnard College)

Description:

  • Through readings, outside speakers, and research proposals, this group will highlight the importance of integrating biological and societal factors during the studying and teaching of autism spectrum disorders.
  • Currently, more males have been diagnosed, mostly due to testing limitations and gender biases.
  • Bringing together scholars and students, the Columbia community can explore further research pathways to help fully understand the role of sex and gender in autism spectrum diagnosis and intervention.

Recipients:

  • Sarah Ying Bai (Undergraduate Student (2018); Department of English and Comparative Literature)
  • James Gong (Undergraduate Student; Department of Astronomy)
  • Coleman Sherry (Undergraduate Student; Department of History)

Description:

  • With a focus on its undergraduate members, this reading group will focus on plants and their role in current and historical societal concerns.
  • While the weekly meeting will discuss student-selected texts, there will be additional speaker sessions and field trips to add further context and learning opportunities.
  • This interdisciplinary exchange will help further students understand the role of science in societies past and present.