Columbia
Courses in Science and Society at Columbia University

Columbia and Barnard have a constellation of faculty members located in a variety of departments and institutes whose research and interests lie at the intersection of science and the humanities. Among many specializations, include the historical development of scientific knowledge and in the processes—technical, social, political, intellectual, material and cultural—by which knowledge has been acquired, disseminated, and employed.

List of Courses: 2017 Fall Undergraduate

Archive for 2017 Fall Undergraduate – Page 2

E6998-9: Cybersecurity -Technology, Policy and Law | S. Bellovin

Computer Science
Undergraduate and Graduate Lecture
Tu 4:10-6PM

This course will bring together professors and select students from three schools to discuss how different disciplines solve cybersecurity issues. Classes will cover the technical underpinnings of the Internet and computer security; the novel legal aspects from technology, crime and national security; and the various policy problems and solutions involved in this new field. Class discussion will range freely between the technologies and implications of cyber security, crime, and conflict.

Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission. Selected topics in computer science. Content varies from year to year. May be repeated for credit.

Link to Vergil

GU4615: The Psychology of Culture and Diversity | V. Purdie-Vaughns

Psychology
Undergraduate and Graduate Seminar
Tu 2:10-4:00PM

The instructor’s permission is required; some basic knowledge of social psychology is desirable. A comprehensive examination of how culture and diversity shape psychological processes. The class will explore psychological and political underpinnings of culture and diversity, emphasizing social psychological approaches. Topics include culture and self, culture and social cognition, group and identity formation, science of diversity, stereotyping, prejudice, and gender. Applications to real-world phenomena discussed.

Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission; some basic knowledge of social psychology is desirable.

Link to Vergil

BC3333: Genetics, Biodiversity & Society | B. Morton, P. V. Ammirato, S. Pereira

Science and Public Policy
Undergraduate Seminar
Tu 2:10-4PM

Module I: Development and Valuation of Plant Genetic Resources. Science and consequences of plant breeding, biotechnology, and genetic engineering; costs and benefits of maintaining biodiversity; public policy issues and options. Module II: Genetic Technology and Society. Human genome project, scientific basis and interpretation of genetic screening; individual choice, social implications, and ethical issues.

Instructor’s permission required. Students should contact B. Morton.

Link to Vergil

BC3334: Science, State Power & Ethics | T. Halpin-Healy

Science and Public Policy
Undergraduate Seminar
Tu 4:10-6PM

A comparative study of science in the service of the State in the U.S., the former Soviet Union, Fascist Italy, and Nazi Germany during pivotal periods through the first half of the 20th century. Topics to be covered include the political and moral consequences of policies based upon advances in the natural sciences making possible the development of TNT, nerve gas, uranium fission and hydrogen fusion atomic bombs. Considers the tensions involved in balancing scientific imperatives, patriotic commitment to the nation-state, and universal moral principles and tensions faced by Robert Oppenheimer, Andrei Sakharov, Neils Bohr and Werner Heisenberg. Selected readings include: Michael Frayn’s play Copenhagen, Hitler’s Uranium Club by Jeremy Bernstein, Brecht’s Galileo, John McPhee’s The Curve of Binding Energy, Richard Rhodes’ The Making of the Atomic Bomb.

Link to Vergil

GU4645: Culture, Motivation and Prosocial Behavior | S. Komissarouk

Psychology
Undergraduate and Graduate Seminar
W 2:10-4:00PM

Reviews and integrates current research on three important topics of social psychology: culture, motivation, and prosocial behavior. Discussions and readings will cover theoretical principles, methodological approaches, and the intersection of these three topics. Students will write a personal research proposal based on the theories presented during the seminar.

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of Research Methods, Statistics, and Social Psychology, plus Instructor’s Permission.

Link to Vergil

UN3930: Life at the End of Life: Palliative Medicine and Service | R. Pollack and J. Davis

American Studies
Undergraduate Seminar
Th 4:10 – 6PM

This Seminar is designed to provide opportunities for readings and reflections on the experience of volunteer service work. At least one prior semester of volunteer work in a clinical setting relevant to the syllabus is recommended. The fieldwork component of the course is met by the student’s continued direct service work in that context, during the course itself.

Link to Vergil

GR8906: Craft and Science in the Early Modern World | P. Smith

History
Graduate Seminar open to advanced undergraduates
M 10:10AM to 2PM with required lab times through the semester

This course studies the materials, techniques, settings, and meanings of skilled craft and artistic practices in the early modern period (1350-1750), in order to reflect upon a series of issues, including craft knowledge and artisanal epistemology; the intersections between craft and science; and questions of historical methodology and evidence in the reconstruction of historical experience. The course will be run as a “Laboratory Seminar,” with discussions of primary and secondary materials, as well as text-based research and hands-on work in a laboratory. This course is one component of the Making and Knowing Project of the Center for Science and Society. This course contributes to the collective production of a transcription, English translation, and critical edition of a late sixteenth-century manuscript in French, Ms. Fr. 640. In 2014-15, the course concentrated on mold-making and metalworking. In 2015-16, it focused on color-making, including pigments, varnishes, cold enamels, dyes, imitation gems, and other color processes, and in 2016-17 on vernacular natural history and practical optics. Students are encouraged to take this course for both semesters (or more), but will receive full credit only once. Different laboratory work and readings will be carried out each semester. This course will also be open to a small number of select undergraduates, with instructor’s permission and an add/drop form.

Link to Vergil

GU4635: Science Fiction Poetics | M. Golston

English
Undergraduate and Graduate Lecture
MW 6:10-7:25PM

“A book of philosophy should in part be a kind of science fiction. How else can one write but of those things which one doesn’t know, or knows badly? It is precisely there that we imagine having something to say. We write only at the frontiers of our knowledge, at the border which separates our knowledge from our ignorance and transforms the one into the other.” — Gilles Deleuze, Difference and Repetition.

Link to Vergil

 

UN3879: The Medical Imaginary | L. Sharp

Anthropology
Undergraduate Seminar
M 10:10-12PM

How might we speak of an imaginary within biomedicine? This course interrogates the ideological underpinnings of technocratic medicine in contexts that extend from the art of surgery to patient participation in experimental drug trials. Issues of scale will prove especially important in our efforts to track the medical imaginary from the whole, fleshy body to the molecular level. Key themes include everyday ethics; ways of seeing and knowing; suffering and hope; and subjectivity in a range of medical and sociomedical contexts.

Prerequisites: Open to anthropology majors; non-majors require instructor’s permission.

Link to Vergil

UN3966: Culture and Mental Health | K. Seeley

Anthropology
Undergraduate Seminar
Tu 10:10-12PM

This course considers mental disturbance and its relief by examining historical, anthropological, psychoanalytic and psychiatric notions of self, suffering, and cure. After exploring the ways in which conceptions of mental suffering and abnormality are produced, we look at specific kinds of psychic disturbances and at various methods for their alleviation.

Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission. Limited to juniors & seniors.

Link to Vergil


@The Center of Science and Society at Columbia University 2016
| Contact Us | Non-Discrimination | |