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December 2017

Ruth Ottman – Genetics of the Epilepsies: Developments and Dilemmas

December 18, 2017, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Rm. 405A and B, Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, 10th Floor, Presbyterian Hospital (PH) Building, 622 W. 168th Street
New York, NY United States
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This presentation will describe findings from research on these issues in an important group of stakeholders: members of families containing multiple individuals with epilepsy.

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What is Life: What Did the First Life Look Like?

December 20, 2017, 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Caveat, 21 A Clinton St
New York, NY 10002 United States
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The question “What is life?” takes just three words. But it is one of the hardest questions in science, attracting researchers from a huge range of disciplines, from molecular biology to astronomy to philosophy. This fall, science writer Carl Zimmer delves into this question by talking to eight experts over four nights to understand what the newest research tells us about life.

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January 2018

Rayna Rapp – Banking on DNA: The New Non-Invasive Prenatal Tests in Comparative Perspective

January 8, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, 622 W. 168th Street , 10th Floor
New York, NY 10032 United States
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Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research 622 West 168 Street, Room 10-405A&B Speaker: Rayna Rapp, Professor of Anthropology, New York University Qualitative social scientists have produced powerful and nuanced analyses of the benefits and burdens experienced by pregnant women and their supporters when accessing reproductive technologies. What lessons can be drawn from this ethnographic corpus that will help us to situate the social and cultural tensions now spreading with the rapid expansion and uptake of the new non-invasive prenatal tests?…

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Opening Reception – The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal

January 8, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Grey Art Gallery, NYU, 100 Washington Square East
New York, NY United States
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The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal is the first U.S. museum exhibition to present the extraordinary drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal (Spain, 1852–1934), the father of modern neuroscience.

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Pass the Flamingo: The Cuisine of Ancient Rome with Andrew Coletti

January 8, 9:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Caveat, 21 A Clinton St
New York, NY 10002 United States
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Join history and food educator Andrew Coletti on a journey through the Ancient Roman foodscape. We’ll sample recreated Roman delicacies, play a game of Name That Spice, and examine art, archaeology and literature to uncover the Roman love affair with food.

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The Story Collider: Communication

January 9, 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Caveat, 21 A Clinton St
New York, NY 10002 United States
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Welcome to The Story Collider!  This evening's storytellers explore the meaning and use of communication through a prism of personal, professional and scientific experience.  

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Talks Progress Administration: Memory’s First Kiss

January 15, 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Caveat, 21 A Clinton St
New York, NY 10002 United States
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Memory’s First Kiss untangles the deeply personal decisions and moments behind Wendy Suzuki’s astonishing research on memory. The performance offers a window into the messy, raw and all too human side of the hard sciences.

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New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Thomas Dodman

January 17, 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Buell Hall, Maison Francaise, Columbia University
New York, NY 10027 United States
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From the late 17th through the late 19th century, nostalgia denoted a form of homesickness so extreme that it could sometimes be deadly. What Nostalgia Was unearths that history. Thomas Dodman traces the invention of nostalgia as a medical diagnosis in Basel, Switzerland, its spread through the European republic of letters and into Napoleon's armies, its subsequent transformation from a medical term to a more expansive cultural concept, and its shift in meaning in the colonies, where Frenchmen worried about racial and cultural mixing came to view moderate homesickness as salutary. Thomas Dodman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of French. David Bell is a Professor of History at Princeton.  Emmanuelle Saada is an Associate Professor of History and French at Columbia.

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Convergence: Cities Confront Rising Seas

January 18, 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Caveat, 21 A Clinton St
New York, NY 10002 United States
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This month: ice sheet researcher Robin Bell of Columbia's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory will join Dan Zarrilli, Senior Director of Climate Policy and Programs and Chief Resiliency Officer of New York City, and host Meehan Crist, to ask: How will rising seas change coastal cities?

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Laure Moutet Manheimer – Essential Oils in Their Social and Geographical Environment: An Experience for the Senses

January 19, 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
LuEsther T. Mertz Library – New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd
Bronx, NY 10458 United States
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Laure Moutet Manheimer will “free essential oils from their dark brown bottles” by tracing plant extracts back to their source. Discover where the plants come from, who the people are that grow them, and learn how essential oils are extracted.

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