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December 2017

The Success of Failure: Perspectives from the Arts, Sciences, Humanities, Education, and Law

December 7, 2017 - December 8, 2017
Cowin Auditorium, 3040 Broadway
New York, NY 10027 United States
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We are all familiar with the platitudes teaching us the value of failure on the path to success, constrained by a view of failure as a means to an end, a necessary obstacle to be overcome. What about the intrinsic value of failure? Failure that contains valuable data, not just an error message? Failure that is a critical part of the process? Can there be such a thing as positive failure? Can failure make progress? Can we use failure to improve creativity, education, or behavior? How do we research and recognize failure? This two-day conference will investigate these and other perspectives on failure across disciplines, searching for commonalities and differences.

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Megan Todd – The Biology of Disadvantage: The Immune System and Social Inequality

December 7, 2017, 12:15 pm - 2:00 pm
602 Lewisohn Hall, Ward H. Dennis Room, New York, NY United States + Google Map

Megan Todd, postdoctoral scholar at the Columbia Aging Center, discusses The Biology of Disadvantage: The Immune System and Social Inequality.

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Daphne C. Watkins – From Angry Black Men to #BlackBoyJoy: The Evolution of Mental Health and Manhood Among Young Black Men

December 7, 2017, 12:15 pm - 1:15 pm
Columbia School of Social Work – Room C05, New York, NY 10027 United States + Google Map

In “From Angry Black Men to #BlackBoyJoy: The Evolution of Mental Health and Manhood Among Young Black Men,” Prof Watkins will discuss the origin and successful implementation of the Young, Black Men, Masculinities, and Mental Health (YBMen) project, an intervention created to address the unique pressures and needs of young black men, especially issues related to their masculinity and mental health.

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Megan Coyer – James Hogg (1770-1835) and Illness Narratives in a Scottish Context

December 11, 2017, 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Heyman Center for the Humanities, Second Floor Common Room, Columbia University
New York, NY 10027 United States
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This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies, healthy and unwell. Megan Coyer of the University of Glasgow discusses the interdisciplinary nature of narration and medicine, specifically surrounding James Hogg (1770-1835).

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Marcella Walker – Parathyroid Hormone: A Novel, Modifiable Risk Factor for Age-Related Cognitive Decline?

December 12, 2017, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Allan Rosenfield Building, Room 440, 722 West 168th Street, 722 West 168th Street
New York, NY United States
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Marcella Walker, MD -- a Columbia Aging Center Faculty Research Fellow -- will present findings in her seminar "Parathyroid Hormone – A Novel, Modifiable Risk Factor for Age-Related Cognitive Decline?"

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Ruth Ottman – Genetics of the Epilepsies: Developments and Dilemmas

December 18, 2017, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Rm. 405A and B, Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, 10th Floor, Presbyterian Hospital (PH) Building, 622 W. 168th Street
New York, NY United States
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This presentation will describe findings from research on these issues in an important group of stakeholders: members of families containing multiple individuals with epilepsy.

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January 2018

Rayna Rapp – Banking on DNA: The New Non-Invasive Prenatal Tests in Comparative Perspective

January 8, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, 622 W. 168th Street , 10th Floor
New York, NY 10032 United States
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Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research 622 West 168 Street, Room 10-405A&B Speaker: Rayna Rapp, Professor of Anthropology, New York University Qualitative social scientists have produced powerful and nuanced analyses of the benefits and burdens experienced by pregnant women and their supporters when accessing reproductive technologies. What lessons can be drawn from this ethnographic corpus that will help us to situate the social and cultural tensions now spreading with the rapid expansion and uptake of the new non-invasive prenatal tests?…

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New Books in the Arts & Sciences: Celebrating Recent Work by Thomas Dodman

January 17, 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Buell Hall, Maison Francaise, Columbia University
New York, NY 10027 United States
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From the late 17th through the late 19th century, nostalgia denoted a form of homesickness so extreme that it could sometimes be deadly. What Nostalgia Was unearths that history. Thomas Dodman traces the invention of nostalgia as a medical diagnosis in Basel, Switzerland, its spread through the European republic of letters and into Napoleon's armies, its subsequent transformation from a medical term to a more expansive cultural concept, and its shift in meaning in the colonies, where Frenchmen worried about racial and cultural mixing came to view moderate homesickness as salutary. Thomas Dodman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of French. David Bell is a Professor of History at Princeton.  Emmanuelle Saada is an Associate Professor of History and French at Columbia.

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Eliza Brown – Diagnosis without Bodily Material: Stunted Multiplicity and the Specters of Disease

January 22, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Knox Hall, Room 501D, 606 W 122nd Street
New York, NY 10027 United States
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This workshop series is primarily designed to assist advanced graduate students with their ongoing research projects. The workshop aims to expose participants to original approaches to social studies of science and technology, but also to expose students to solutions to common challenges of academic work.

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Nadine Burke Harris – The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity

January 22, 3:00 pm - 5:30 pm
The Italian Academy at Columbia University, 1161 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10027 United States
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A pioneer in the field of medicine, Dr. Nadine Burke Harris is a leader in the movement to transform how we respond to early childhood adversity and the resulting toxic stress that dramatically impacts our health and longevity. By exploring the science behind childhood adversity, she offers a new way to understand the adverse events that affect all of us throughout our lifetimes.

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