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February 2017

Stephanie Dick – After Math: Reasoning, Proving, and Computing in Postwar United States

February 22, 2017, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
NYU Gallatin, 1 Washington Place, Room 801
New York, NY 10003
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With a focus on communities based in the United States in the second half of the twentieth century, this talk will introduce different visions of the computer as a mathematical agent, software that was crafted to animate those imaginings, and the novel practices and materialities of mathematical knowledge-making that emerged in tandem.

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March 2017

Neil Safier – Where Entangled Empires and Early Modern Science Intertwine: An Iberoamerican Perspective

March 29, 2017, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
CUNY Graduate Center Room C/197, 365 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10016 United States
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This talk explores the confluence, in the last two decades, between a new kind of imperial history that seeks to decenter and render more permeable the contours of individual empires in the early modern world and a similar phenomenon in the history of early modern science.

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April 2017

Ann-Sophie Barwich – Scent Track: What can the History of Olfaction tell us about Theorizing in the Life Sciences?

April 26, 2017, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street
New York, NY
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Perfumery may possibly be the second oldest business in the history of mankind. Olfaction, the sense of smell, has attracted systematic interest in scientific studies only recently, however. The discovery of the olfactory receptor genes by Linda Buck and Richard Axel in 1991 catapulted olfaction into core neurobiological research. Seldom does a discovery represent the birth of an experimental system as markedly as in the case of the olfactory receptors. Olfaction has been a fairly neglected field before, conducted only by a few but dedicated researchers throughout the past centuries.

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September 2017

John Tresch – Barnum, Bache, and Poe: American Science and the Antebellum Public

September 27, 2017, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Fayerweather Hall Room #513, Columbia University, 1180 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10027 United States
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This talk will explore how the sharp increase of printed matter and an elitist movement to unify knowledge through centralized institutions in the 1840s influenced Barnum, Bach, and Poe, therefore changing the relations of science and public in this early phase of industrialization.

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October 2017

Michael J. Barany – Invidious Comparisons: International Politics, the Fields Medal, and the Past, Present, and Future of Mathematics, 1936-1966

October 11, 2017, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Fayerweather Hall Room #513, Columbia University, 1180 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10027 United States
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First presented in 1936, the Fields Medal quickly became one of mathematicians' most prestigious, famous, and in some cases notorious prizes. Because its deliberations are confidential, we know very little about the early Fields Medals. This talk will analyze newly discovered letters from the 1950 and 1958 Fields Medal committees.

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Whitney Laemmli – Measured Movements: Weimar Germany, Labanotation, and the Choreography of Corporate Life

October 25, 2017, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
NYU Gallatin, 1 Washington Place, Room 801
New York, NY 10003
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In 1928, the German choreographer Rudolf Laban announced what he believed to be an explosive development in the history of dance: the creation of an inscription system that could “objectively” record human movement on paper. The technique, known as “Labanotation,” relied upon byzantine combinations of lines, tick marks, and boxes. In this talk, Dr. Laemmli will explore two seemingly distant, but in fact closely-linked, moments from Labanotation’s history: its origins in the anxiety-ridden, vibratory atmosphere of Weimar Germany and its use in the American and British corporate office in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s.

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November 2017

Monica Azzolini – Saints and Science in Early Modern Italy: Filippo Neri and Francesco Borgia as Patron Saints of Earthquakes

November 29, 2017, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Fayerweather Hall Room #513, Columbia University, 1180 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10027 United States
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This event is part of the New York History of Science Lecture Series and features Monica Azzolini, a Senior Lecturer in Early Modern European History, University of Edinburgh.

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January 2018

James Delbourgo – The Origins of Public Museums: Hans Sloane’s Collections and the Creation of the British Museum

January 31, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street
New York, NY
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In 1759 London’s British Museum opened its doors for the first time – the first free national public museum in the world. But how did it come into being? This talk recounts the overlooked yet colorful life of the museum’s founder: Sir Hans Sloane. The little-known life of one of the Enlightenment’s most controversial luminaries provides a new story about the beginnings of public museums through their origins in imperialism and slavery.

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February 2018

Lynnette Regouby – Threshold: Generations of Change in Botanical Practice at the end of the Ancien Regime

February 28, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Fayerweather Hall Room #513, Columbia University, 1180 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10027 United States
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This event is part of the New York History of Science Lecture Series and will feature Dr Lynette Regouby.

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March 2018

María M. Portuondo – American Convergence: Science and Technology in Colonial Latin America

March 28, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
CUNY Graduate Center, Room 9207, 365 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10016 United States
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The essential backdrop of the history of the region we now call Latin America is the centuries-long process of negotiation between the different social, religious, cultural and political registers of the Indigenous, African and European peoples who came to inhabit the area. The resulting American scientific and technological convergence involved the combination and recombination of practices whose exact origins are difficult to trace. This talk proposes a framework for the study of the scientific and technological registers of the American convergence. It recognizes the hybrid, complex and local nature of the convergence and explores these through three kinds of human activities: learning, moving and making.

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